Ask A Pagan

About me  

I am a Heathen, and a Pagan religious hedgewitch.
I post various Pagan-related stuff. Some of it is relevant to my paths, some of it is more general.
Questions? Comments? Hit up the Ask box
kaynarune:

villieldr:

paganism:

Soooo true!

Oh, Gods, where to begin…
The Christians did not “steal” Christmas from us.
Ostara is not a Norse Heathen holiday. TL;DR, you can blame Bede and Jakob Grimm for the confusion surrounding that. And most Easter traditions are, in fact, Abrahamic in origin.
Samhain, Imbolc, and Beltane are not Norse Heathen holidays; they are Gaelic seasonal holidays. Samhain marks the end of the harvest season and Beltane, the beginning of spring. Some ways that people today in Ireland, the UK, and the US celebrate Halloween and May Day do have roots in Gaelic traditions, but that would probably be better addressed by irelandseyeonmyth (if they would like to and have the time).
Imbolc was (probably) historically associated with the Goddess Brighid and later Christianized to be about Saint Brighid, who is herself a Christianized version of the Goddess. It has absolutely nothing to do with Valentine’s Day, which originated as a celebration of a Catholic Saint.
As for the days of the week, their modern names in English are indeed of Germanic origin, except for Saturday. Saturn is a Roman God and has absolutely nothing to do with Norse Heathenry. In Old Norse, that day of the week is rendered as laugardagr, or “washing-day”/”bath day”. (And no, that word is in no way related to Loki.)
Oh, and as long as you’re being smug about the days of the week, it would be more accurate to say that Monday was associated with Máni and Sunday with Sunna, rather than “monday was moonday” and “sunday was for worshiping the sun.”
This kind of attitude toward Christians and Christianity never makes anyone look good, but it’s much worse when you don’t even bother to fact-check.

I can’t agree hard enough with villieldr on this.

kaynarune:

villieldr:

paganism:

Soooo true!

Oh, Gods, where to begin…

The Christians did not “steal” Christmas from us.

Ostara is not a Norse Heathen holiday. TL;DR, you can blame Bede and Jakob Grimm for the confusion surrounding that. And most Easter traditions are, in fact, Abrahamic in origin.

Samhain, Imbolc, and Beltane are not Norse Heathen holidays; they are Gaelic seasonal holidays. Samhain marks the end of the harvest season and Beltane, the beginning of spring. Some ways that people today in Ireland, the UK, and the US celebrate Halloween and May Day do have roots in Gaelic traditions, but that would probably be better addressed by irelandseyeonmyth (if they would like to and have the time).

Imbolc was (probably) historically associated with the Goddess Brighid and later Christianized to be about Saint Brighid, who is herself a Christianized version of the Goddess. It has absolutely nothing to do with Valentine’s Day, which originated as a celebration of a Catholic Saint.

As for the days of the week, their modern names in English are indeed of Germanic origin, except for Saturday. Saturn is a Roman God and has absolutely nothing to do with Norse Heathenry. In Old Norse, that day of the week is rendered as laugardagr, or “washing-day”/”bath day”. (And no, that word is in no way related to Loki.)

Oh, and as long as you’re being smug about the days of the week, it would be more accurate to say that Monday was associated with Máni and Sunday with Sunna, rather than “monday was moonday” and “sunday was for worshiping the sun.”

This kind of attitude toward Christians and Christianity never makes anyone look good, but it’s much worse when you don’t even bother to fact-check.

I can’t agree hard enough with villieldr on this.

1 week ago
128 notes
NO IT’S NOT
JESUS

spell (v.1) early 14c., “read letter by letter, write or say the letters of;” c.1400, “form words by means of letters,” apparently a French word that merged with or displaced a native Old English one; both are from the same Germanic root, but the French word had evolved a different sense. The native word is Old English spellian “to tell, speak, discourse, talk,” from Proto-Germanic *spellam (cognates: Old High German spellon “to tell,” Old Norse spjalla, Gothic spillon “to talk, tell”), from PIE *spel- (2) “to say aloud, recite.”  But the current senses seem to come from Anglo-French espeller, Old French espelir “mean, signify, explain, interpret,” also “spell out letters, pronounce, recite,” from Frankish *spellon “to tell” or some other Germanic source, ultimately identical with the native word.  Related: Spelled; spelling. In early Middle English still “to speak, preach, talk, tell,” hence such expressions as hear spell “hear (something) told or talked about,” spell the wind “talk in vain” (both 15c.). Meaning “form words with proper letters” is from 1580s. Spell out “explain step-by-step” is first recorded 1940, American English. Shakespeare has spell (someone) backwards “reverse the character of, explain in a contrary sense, portray with determined negativity.”spell (n.1) Old English spell “story, saying, tale, history, narrative, fable; discourse, command,” from Proto-Germanic *spellam (see spell (v.1)). Compare Old Saxon spel, Old Norse spjall, Old High German spel, Gothic spill “report, discourse, tale, fable, myth;” German Beispiel “example.” From c.1200 as “an utterance, something said, a statement, remark;” meaning “set of words with supposed magical or occult powers, incantation, charm” first recorded 1570s; hence any means or cause of enchantment. etymonline.com

NO IT’S NOT

JESUS

spell (v.1) Look up spell at Dictionary.comearly 14c., “read letter by letter, write or say the letters of;” c.1400, “form words by means of letters,” apparently a French word that merged with or displaced a native Old English one; both are from the same Germanic root, but the French word had evolved a different sense. The native word is Old English spellian “to tell, speak, discourse, talk,” from Proto-Germanic *spellam (cognates: Old High German spellon “to tell,” Old Norse spjalla, Gothic spillon “to talk, tell”), from PIE *spel- (2) “to say aloud, recite.”

But the current senses seem to come from Anglo-French espeller, Old French espelir “mean, signify, explain, interpret,” also “spell out letters, pronounce, recite,” from Frankish *spellon “to tell” or some other Germanic source, ultimately identical with the native word.

Related: Spelled; spelling. In early Middle English still “to speak, preach, talk, tell,” hence such expressions as hear spell “hear (something) told or talked about,” spell the wind “talk in vain” (both 15c.). Meaning “form words with proper letters” is from 1580s. Spell out “explain step-by-step” is first recorded 1940, American English. Shakespeare has spell (someone) backwards “reverse the character of, explain in a contrary sense, portray with determined negativity.”spell (n.1) Look up spell at Dictionary.comOld English spell “story, saying, tale, history, narrative, fable; discourse, command,” from Proto-Germanic *spellam (see spell (v.1)). Compare Old Saxon spel, Old Norse spjall, Old High German spel, Gothic spill “report, discourse, tale, fable, myth;” German Beispiel “example.” From c.1200 as “an utterance, something said, a statement, remark;” meaning “set of words with supposed magical or occult powers, incantation, charm” first recorded 1570s; hence any means or cause of enchantment. etymonline.com

(Source: wiccaiscoming, via seshattasherit)

1 week ago
347 notes
peoplemask:

vixyish:

xpixiesticksx:

In the wild, wolves and crows (and ravens) are frequently found in each other’s company. The crows fly ahead of the wolf pack to locate prey. In exchange, the grateful wolves leave behind a few tasty morsels for the scavenging crows. There is also evidence that the two species simply enjoy being around each other, as wolves and crows are commonly observed exhibiting playful behavior with one another.

Hee hee hee hee hee this photo
"HI""HI"

'sup woof
'sup caw


♥

peoplemask:

vixyish:

xpixiesticksx:

In the wild, wolves and crows (and ravens) are frequently found in each other’s company. The crows fly ahead of the wolf pack to locate prey. In exchange, the grateful wolves leave behind a few tasty morsels for the scavenging crows. There is also evidence that the two species simply enjoy being around each other, as wolves and crows are commonly observed exhibiting playful behavior with one another.

Hee hee hee hee hee this photo

"HI"
"HI"

'sup woof

'sup caw

(via silentspring17)

2 weeks ago
13,101 notes